Natural Stress Relief Supplements

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There are many different ways to reduce stress in our lives; from quitting a stressful job to exercising. However, sometimes our bodies may need a little extra push to help us battle the stresses of life. With so many products, how do you know which ones to choose? If you are like me and already rely on medications for a health problem, who wants to put take anything and worry about the effects it has on your body? Am, I right? That is why I try to stick to natural stress relief remedies like foods, drinks, and supplements. Of course, these are things my doctor recommends me to take anyways.

natural stress relief products

In fact, did you know that stress literally can eat chunks of the needed vitamins and minerals that your body needs to function?  Not to mention the work being done on our digestive systems makes it hard to absorb these nutrients from the food we eat.

 

This makes it hard for you to combat stress naturally.

 

Getting a diet rich in vitamins and minerals is essential but sometimes that is not always possible and sometimes you have to take supplements.

 

Here is a list of natural stress relief products; stress-fighting vitamins to help you reduce stress.

Vitamin B Complex

The vitamin B-complex is a combination of all essential water-soluble vitamins except for vitamin C. They include thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6), biotin, folic acid, and the cobalamins (B12).

 

All B vitamins convert our food into fuel which gives us energy. I get B12 shots from my doctor every other month for this exact reason.

 

It is given to people who don’t eat a well-balanced diet like with a vegan diet or to women during pregnancy. Some diseases such as lupus can cause B12 deficiencies.

Vitamin B1 Thiamine

How does it help stress?

Vitamin B1 or thiamine strengthens our immune system and regulates or blood sugar. It has been called the anti-stress vitamin because it is believed to help you endure stressful situations.

 
How do I get it?

Thiamine is found in foods such as:

  • beef
  • liver
  • dried milk,
  • nuts,
  • oats,
  • oranges,
  • pork,
  • eggs,
  • seeds,
  • legumes,
  • peas and
  • yeast.

Some foods, such as rice and pasta, are fortified with B1.

Recommended Amount?
 

The recommended daily amounts for thiamine are as follows;

Age
Male
Female
Pregnancy
Lactation
Birth to 6 months*
0.2 mg
0.2 mg
 
 
7–12 months*
0.3 mg
0.3 mg
 
 
1–3 years
0.5 mg
0.5 mg
 
 
4–8 years
0.6 mg
0.6 mg
 
 
9–13 years
0.9 mg
0.9 mg
 
 
14–18 years
1.2 mg
1.0 mg
1.4 mg
1.4 mg
19-50 years
1.2 mg
1.1 mg
1.4 mg
1.4 mg
51+ years
1.2 mg
1.1 mg
 
 
*Adequate Intake (AI)

Vitamin B3 Niacin

How does it help stress?

Vitamin B3 or Niacin, s needed for DNA repair, synthesis of steroidal hormones and energy metabolism within the body. Niacin has the ability to lower blood pressure because it can increase the diameter of our arteries by relaxing the muscles. Also, niacin can counteract excess adrenaline you produce during anxiety.

 
How do you get it?

Here is a list of some of the foods that contain the highest amounts of niacin:

  • Fish (Cooked Yellowfin Tuna)
  • Chicken & Turkey (Cooked Chicken Breast)
  • Pork (Cooked Lean Chop)
  • Liver (Cooked Lamb Liver)
  • Peanuts
  • Beef (Grass-Fed)
  • Mushrooms (Grilled Portobello)
  • Green Peas
  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Avocados
Recommended Amounts?

The recommended daily amounts of riboflavin are as follows:

 
 
 
 
 
Age
Male
Female
Pregnancy
Lactation
Birth to 6 months*
0.3 mg
0.3 mg
 
 
7–12 months*
0.4 mg
0.4 mg
 
 
1–3 years
0.5 mg
0.5 mg
 
 
4–8 years
0.6 mg
0.6 mg
 
 
9–13 years
0.9 mg
0.9 mg
 
 
14–18 years
1.3 mg
1.0 mg
1.4 mg
1.6 mg
19-50 years
1.3 mg
1.1 mg
1.4 mg
1.6 mg
51+ years
1.3 mg
1.1 mg
 
 
* Adequate Intake (AI)
 

Vitamin B5 Pantothenic Acid

How does it help stress?

Vitamin B5 or pantothenic acid is partially responsible for the adrenal function and producing the hormone that fights stress – cortisol. Cortisol is best known for its response to our “fight or flight” response.

 

So ensuring you eat a well-balanced diet in B5 can help give you the natural tools you need when facing stress.

 
 
How do I get it?

Below is a list of high B5 vitamin foods:

  • Mushrooms
  • Cheese
  • Oily Fish
  • Avocados
  • Eggs
  • Lean Pork
  • Beef
  • Veal
  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Sweet Potato
  • Sunflower Seeds
Recommended Amounts?

The recommended daily amounts for  pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) are as follows:

 
Age
Male
Female
Pregnancy
Lactation
Birth to 6 months
0.7 mg*
0.7 mg*
 
 
7–12 months
0.8 mg*
0.8 mg*
 
 
1–3 years
2 mg
2 mg
 
 
4–8 years
3 mg
3 mg
 
 
9–13 years
4 mg
4 mg
 
 
14–18 years
5 mg
5 mg
6 mg
7 mg
19–50 years
5 mg
5 mg
6 mg
7 mg
51+ years
5 mg
5 mg
 
 
* Adequate Intake (AI)

Vitamin B6 Pyridoxine

How does it help stress?

Vitamin B6 or pyridoxine can help the body produce the neurotransmitter serotonin. Stress levels in the body (especially chronic) can lead to high levels of cortisol and low levels of serotonin and other neurotransmitters such as “dopamine”. This has been linked to depression.

 

So eating foods rich in vitamin B6, or taking a supplement, can help keep your body’s levels at a balance.

 
How do I get it?

Below is a list of some of the top foods rich in B6:

  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Pistachio Nuts
  • Fish
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Lean Pork
  • Dried Fruits
  • Lean Beef
  • Avocados
  • Banana
  • Spinach
Recommended Amounts?

The daily recommended amounts of B6 are the following;

 
 
 
 
 
Age
Male
Female
Pregnancy
Lactation
Birth to 6 months
0.1 mg*
0.1 mg*
 
 
7–12 months
0.3 mg*
0.3 mg*
 
 
1–3 years
0.5 mg
0.5 mg
 
 
4–8 years
0.6 mg
0.6 mg
 
 
9–13 years
1.0 mg
1.0 mg
 
 
14–18 years
1.3 mg
1.2 mg
1.9 mg
2.0 mg
19–50 years
1.3 mg
1.3 mg
1.9 mg
2.0 mg
51+ years
1.7 mg
1.5 mg
 
 
* Adequate Intake (AI)
 

Vitamin B12

How does it help stress?

Vitamin B12 or cobalamins are important to the function of our brain and nervous system. A B12 deficiency can make it hard for your body to resist stress and cause anemia, fatigue, and depression. Getting Vitamin B12 shouldn’t be too hard with the number of foods that provide it.

 
How do I get it?

Below is a list of foods rich in vitamin B12;

  • Shellfish
  • Liver
  • Fish
  • Crustaceans
  • Fortified Soy
  • Fortified Cereals
  • Red Meat
  • Low Fat Dairy
  • Cheese
  • Eggs
Recommended Amounts?

The daily recommended amounts of B12 are the following;

Age
Male
Female
Pregnancy
Lactation
Birth to 6 months
 
 
 
 
7–12 months
 
 
 
 
1–3 years
 
 
 
 
4–8 years
 
 
 
 
9–13 years
 
 
 
 
14–18 years
2.4 mg
2.4 mg
2.6 mg
2.8 mg
19–30 years
2.4 mg
2.4 mg
2.6 mg
2.8 mg
31–50 years
2.4 mg
2.4 mg
2.6 mg
2.8 mg
51+ years
reinforced
foods
 
 
Best Vitamin B Complex Supplements

Vitamin C Ascorbic Acid

How does it help stress?

Vitamin C helps cortisol levels produced in the body and also regulates blood pressure during stress. Of course, it is also known for helping the body defend against the common cold. It is easy to get some daily Vitamin C because it is in a number of different foods.

 

Bet you didn’t know there are foods higher in vitamin C than oranges?

 
How do I get it?
  • Citric Fruits (including oranges)
  • Strawberries
  • Pineapples
  • Mangos
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Kiwi
  • Papaya
  • Bell peppers
  • Broccoli
Recommended Amounts?

The recommended daily amounts of Vitamin C are as follows:

Age
Male
Female
Pregnancy
Lactation
Birth to 6 months
40 mg
40 mg
 
 
7–12 months
50 mg
50 mg
 
 
1–3 years
15 mg
15 mg
 
 
4–8 years
25 mg
25 mg
 
 
9–13 years
45 mg
45 mg
 
 
14–18 years
75 mg
65 mg
80 mg
115 mg
19–30 years
90 mg
75 mg
85 mg
115 mg
31–50 years
90 mg
75 mg
85 mg
115 mg
51+ years
90 mg
75 mg
 
 

Magnesium

How does it help stress?

There is a direct correlation between low levels of magnesium and how easy you get stressed. Magnesium is said to be a naturally relaxing supplement because it calms our muscular and nervous systems helping us to cope with stress. Stress, when it is not dealt with, can lead to anxiety and this together can drain your body of magnesium.

 
How do I get it?

Below is a list of foods rich in magnesium;

  •  Bananas
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Spinach
  • Chard
  • Figs
  • Black Beans
  • Avocados
  • Almonds
  • Yogurt
  • Pumpkin Seeds
Recommended Amounts?
Below is a table of the daily recommended amounts of magnesium developed by the Food and Nutrition Board.
Birth to 6 months
30 mg*
30 mg*
 
 
7–12 months
75 mg*
75 mg*
 
 
1–3 years
80 mg
80 mg
 
 
4–8 years
130 mg
130 mg
 
 
9–13 years
240 mg
240 mg
 
 
14–18 years
410 mg
360 mg
400 mg
360 mg
19–30 years
400 mg
310 mg
350 mg
310 mg
31–50 years
420 mg
320 mg
360 mg
320 mg
51+ years
420 mg
320 mg
 
 
 

Melatonin

How does it help stress?

Melatonin is known as our body’s natural sleep aid. It is produced by the brain’s pineal gland to regulate our sleep cycles.

 

Being that I am epileptic, I have had a lot of trouble with sleeping in the past. That was when I was first recommended this supplement by my epileptologist.

 
 
How do I get it?
 

Very small amounts of Melatonin are found in foods such as meats, grains, fruits, and vegetables, but you can also buy it.

 
 
Recommended Amounts?

For adults, it is recommended you take between two-tenths of a milligram and five milligrams of melatonin at least 60 minutes before bedtime, while children should take a smaller dose. Too much melatonin can disrupt your sleep cycle, so it is best to start with the smallest dose of two-tenths of a milligram and increase it as needed. Always consult with your doctor before taking any supplements or if you have any health issues.

Conclusion

Your health is very important, therefore with any sleep, dietary, or other supplements, be sure to consult with your doctor before making any changes.

If you have any questions about this post please feel free to leave a comment below. Any feedback is welcome!

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